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  • MIDDLE EASTERN MAGIC

    The magic of food is like fashion; ever changing, ever evolving, exploring new territories, and rediscovering old classics. Food goes hand in hand with wine, a symbiotic relationship. It’s no different from how spices, herbs, flavours combine, enhance, fuse, attract, and partner.

    There’s a lot of debate about wine and food pairing – whether it works, whether it’s important, whether we wine people get a bit over - obsessed with the whole subject. But it’s all about playing with flavours, styles, and enhancing the whole experience of enjoying food and drink, in a far more relaxed manner than simply wine tasting.

    I’ve always loved the challenge of matching just the right wine, with the right dish, and it’s only when you try it, that you find out how tastes and flavours can blend or clash so dramatically. Having matched up recipes from pretty much everywhere around the globe, the latest one has been a new one for me, since we are working with Iranian cookery school teacher Simi Rezzai - Ghassemi.

    Unlike the more heated, feisty flavours of Tunisia, Morocco, India and the Far East, there is a wondrous delicacy, subtlety, and sweet gentleness about Iranian food, and Simi’s cooking. Showcasing some classic dishes from her homeland, we’ve already had a little practice session to pair up the wines. I’ve given up protesting that my job is tough, since no one ever believes me, but this was genuinely a fun learning curve for me.

    To tantalise and tempt, here’s a teaser, and some suggestions for those of you who want to explore ideas at home.  The main rule is to keep the wines fragrant, aromatic, juicy, pretty, and evocative, just like the style of the food. Avoid the heaviness of oak in both whites and reds, and as I learnt, gentle, fruity dry roses are also great.

    Having said that Simi put me straight to the challenge, with a traditional broth called ‘Osh’, bursting with the heady fragrances of coriander, chives and parsley. I’ve always struggled with drinking wine with soup, it just doesn’t seem to work. But a punchy, lip-smacking, tangy small glass of Fino or Manzanilla sherry does the trick. The popularity of sherry is running high again, so join the revolution. Try La Guita Manzanilla, from the seaside town of Sanlucar de Barrameda, with its blazingly white houses, cobbled streets and seafront tapas bars, where the seafood is about as fresh as it gets. My idea of heaven. Crisp, tangy, with a nutty, salty bite, and searingly dry, it sends a tingle down the spine with its intensity.

    Another dish that Simi has created is ‘Kookoo’ a type of Iranian frittata, using more herbs, but also turmeric and walnuts, with the addition of punchy, crunchy barbaries, which bring both sweetness and lemony freshness. Wherever I can, I like to bring in wines from the region, and as Lebanon isn’t a million miles away, I’ve paired this with the zesty fresh, yet alluringly exotic Ixsir Altitudes White, a crisp, citrusy, white, from the Sauvignon and Semillon, enhanced by a dollop of perfumed Viognier and Muscat. Similarly any aromatic, fragrant white, with an off-dry edge would work.

    The beauty of Iranian food, like so much in Mediterranean and also Asian cultures, is the aspect of sharing; it’s all about families and friends. Beautifully fragrant rice, delicate saffron and lemon-infused chicken, the most gorgeously pretty of seasonal salads, packed with herbs and embellished with edible flowers, and a little accompaniment of yoghurt with thyme and rose petals. I’ve always loved dry rose wines with Middle Eastern food, in fact with most gently, and more intensely spiced foods. Most dry fruity pinks will work, you need bolder, fleshier New World style for hot dishes, but with the exquisitely tender style of Persian food, lighter, crisp European wines work to.  For this colourful, elegant feast, I’ve picked Chivite Las Fincas 2016, in its stylishly curvy bottle, gossamer pale, and exuding scents and flavours of ripe strawberries and cranberries, fruity, yet characterful, with a lingering citrus finish.

    Red wines also work, but they need to be soft, juicy, and velvety, with a lightness of touch. The softness of Pinot Noir works, as does the juicy style of Garnacha, but again, with the opportunity to staying close to Iranian roots, I’ve gone for a smooth, lighter style of  red from neighbouring Turkey, K of Kapadokia 2012, full of gentle, velvety plum and spice character, with a softness of touch. Turkish wines are getting a lot of attention in the wine world these days, and there are some real gems to be discovered, from one of the countries with the oldest heritage of wine production.

    By Angela Mount

  • Crumbs!

    Chilli Con Vegan, Saffron Rice, Avocado & Lime Salad

    Ingredients
    2 medium onions, finely diced
    4 garlic cloves, grated
    1 medium leek, finely sliced
    3 red chillis, finely sliced
    5 tbsp premium rapeseed oil
    3 heaped tbsp coriander seeds
    3 heaped tbsp cumin seeds
    3 tbsp smoked paprika
    1 tsp ground cinnamon
    3 tbsp dried oregano
    6 lime leaves, chopped
    1 whole nutmeg, for grating
    3 tbsp tomato purée
    250g dried green lentils
    2 x 400g tins red kidney beans
    2 x 400g tins black beans
    3 x 400g tins chopped tomatoes
    bunch coriander, stalks and leaves seperated and chopped
    1.2 ltrs vegetable stock
    1kg easy cook rice
    good pinch of saffron
    5 limes (zest of all, juice of 3)
    1kg cherry tomatoes, halved
    4 avocados, peeled stoned and sliced
    mixed salad leaves
    sour cream, to serve

    Method
    1. For the chilli, place the onion, garlic, leek and chilli into your largest, heavy-based pan over a medium heat with 3 tbsp rapeseed oil. Fry for about 5 mins, or until softened.
    2. Meanwhile, toast the coriander and cumin seeds together on a medium heat, then grind in a pestle and mortar.
    3. Add the spices, dried herbs and a good grating of nutmeg to the large pan and fry for 2 more mins - if it's a little dry at this point, add a splash of water to help it out. Stir in the tomato purée and cook for a further 2 mins.
    4. Stir in the lentils. Drain, rinse and stir in the beans, followed by the tomatoes, chopped coriander stalks and the stock.
    5. Bring it all to the boil slowly, then reduce to a low heat and let it bubble away for atleast 1 hour, or until thickened and reduced, stirring every 15-20 mins. Season to taste.
    6. For the saffron rice, put the rice in a pan with twice the amount of cold water, add a few strands of saffron and season well. Bring to the boil gently, and simmer until the water is nearly gone and the rice is light and fluffy, with a little bite.
    7. When ready to serve, combine the lime zest and juice with the tomatoes, avocado, coriander leaves, and mixed salad leaves.
    8. Serve the chilli with the rice, and top with the salad and sour cream.

     

    A Grape Match...

    Trapiche Melodias Malbec 2016

    There's a whole stack of spicy flavours going on in this dish, so a soft, spicy red is the way to go. This is a fresher, lighter style of Malbec, full of bright, cherry and plum fruit, with hints of cocoa and vanilla; it's lively enough to cope with the heady combination of chilli, smoked paprika and cinnamon in the mix.

  • Crumbs!

    Moroccan-Inspired Pacific Bowl

    Ingredients
    glug of olive oil
    2tsp sweet paprika
    1tsp ground cumin
    1tsp ground coriander
    8 organic chicken thighs, boned and skinned (reserve the skin)
    4 tomatoes, cut in half
    2 tbsp harissa paste
    2 medium-sweet potatoes
    1tbsp ras-el-hanout
    1 x 400g tin chickpeas
    200g couscous
    bunch mint, chopped
    bunch coriander, chopped
    handful flat leaf parsley, chopped
    1 red onion
    juice of 1 lime
    1 pomegranate, seeds only
    250ml organic natural yoghurt
    handful of dill, chopped
    garlic clove, grated
    handful of baby spinach per bowl
    1 red chilli, finely chopped
    1/2 lemon, juice only

    Method
    1. Mix the olive oil with 1tsp of the sweet paprika, the ground cumin and ground coriander. Season the mixture, and cover the chicken in it. Leave to marinade, ideally overnight.
    2. Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/gas mark 6.
    3. Roast the thighs for 25 mins or until cooked through.
    4. Season the skin and place on a tray between 2 sheets of greaseproof paper. Place another tray on top and roast for 20 mins or until crispy.
    5. Meanwhile, season the tomatoes with salt and pepper and mix with the harissa paste. Roast this in the oven too, for about 20 mins.
    6. once there's room in the oven, roast the sweet potatoes in the ras-el-hanout with olive oil, salt and pepper.
    7. Drain and rinse the chickpeas, before drying them and laying them on a baking tray. Roast in the oven; they can take anywhere from 40 mins to an hour to become crunchy and golden.
    8. Meanwhile, make the couscous. Put the grain in a bowl, sprinkle over 1tsp sweet paprika, add a little olive oil and cover with boiling water. Cover with cling film and leave for 15mins. When it's ready, fluff with a fork and mix in a handful each of mint, coriander and parsley.
    9. Thinly slice the red onion and add to a bowl. Squeeze over the lime juice and add a pinch of salt, and mix. The onions will soften and slightly pickle/cook in the acidity. Add the pomegranate seeds and leave to let the flavours infuse.
    10. Mix the the yoghurt with another handful each of chopped mint, coriander and ill, and the garlic. Stir to combine.
    11. To assemble, place the couscous in each bowland scatter over the chickpeas and sweet potatoes. Next, add a handful of spinach on one side, and the tomatoes the other. Slice the chicken thighs and place two in each bowl. Top with the yoghurt dressing and pomegranate and red onion salsa and crumble over the crispy chicken skin. Finish off with the sliced chilli and lemon juice.
    TIP. To make this vegetarian, use feta and avocado instead of chicken.

     

    A Grape Match...

    Planeta Rosé 2016

    Dry rosés are perfect with this style of Middle Eastern food. This one's strawberry and pink grapefruit flavours pick up the delicate and varied character of the fresh herbs, crunchy pomegranate and sweet ras-al-hanout spice. Vibrant and refreshing, this is the very taste of summer.

  • Crumbs!

    Harvest Burgers

    Ingredients
    thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger
    1/2 garlic clove
    250ml toasted sesame oil
    100ml cider vinegar
    100ml tamari
    1 block of smoked or plain tofu
    2 large portabello mushrooms
    1 avocado
    2 bread rolls of your choice
    1 pack of Violife vegan smoked gouda
    2 handfuls of rocket

    Method
    1. First, knock together the marinade by grating in the ginger and the garlic and combining with the sesame oil, vinegar and tamari in a bowl.
    2. Cut the tofu block lengthways and put that and the mushrooms into the marinade. Cover and leave overnight.
    3. Whack the tofu and mushroom on the barbeque.
    4. Mash 1/2 the avocado onto each roll.
    5. Turn the tofu, making sure its gone a little bit crispy. You don't want jelly-like tofu, or to overcook it either. There's a fine line!
    6. Once the tofu is cooked, put two slices of the smoked gouda on top and let it melt for 20 seconds.
    7. Stack up the tofu, a handful of rocket leaves, and the mushroom inside the bun.
    8. Enjoy!

    A Grape Match...


    Columbia Valley Estate Riesling 2015

    The Asian-style marinade here calls for a chilled, aromatic white. This elegant, fruity version from Washington State brims with green apple, lime zest and nectarine, so it has the fruitiness to cope with the sweet and sour flavours.

  • Crumbs!

    Crispy Skinned Pork Belly With Apple And Onion Veloute

     

    Ingredients
    5 garlic cloves
    100ml pomice oil
    handful rosemary, chopped
    handful thyme, chopped
    pork belly (2kg), ribs off
    1/2 pint cider
    knob of butter
    4 shallots chopped
    3 apples, cored, peeled and sliced
    200ml double cream
    12 baby potatoes
    12 baby leeks

    Method
    1. Preheat the oven to 210C/415F/gas mark6
    2. Chop or crush the garlic and mix it with the oil before adding the chopped rosemary and thyme.
    3. Brush the pork belly all over with the mixture (apart from the skin) and season it with salt and pepper.
    4. Put it in the oven, skin side up, for 10 mins. Then pour the cider on the pork belly, put baking paper on the top of the skin, and cover the tray with foil. Turn down the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4 and let it cook for 90 mins.
    5. Once the pork is ready (the skin should be golden brown) remove from the oven and leave it to cool. Then, press the pork - use an oven tray with something heavy on top - and refridgerate for a minimum of 12 hours. The next day the pork belly is ready to get portioned.
    6. For the veloute, heat the butter in a pan and add shallots and the apples to sweet down until soft. This should take about 10 mins. When they are soft, add the cream. Take the pan off the heat and, using a food processor or a hand blender, puree the mixture. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
    7. Chop the new potatoes in half and boil until they are soft. Heat some butter in a pan and fry the baby leeks. Just before they are ready, add the new potatoes and season.
    8. Once the veloute and vegetables are almost ready, heat some oil in a pan and preheat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Salt the skin side of each portion of pork belly and place in the pan, skin side down. Fry for 5 mins before putting in the oven for 10 mins to warm the meat through.
    9. To serve, spread 1 tbsp of veloute across the plate, put the new potatoes and baby leeks on top and, when the pork belly is nice and crispy, put it on the top of the vegetables as the hero of the dish.

     

    A Grape Match...

    Ken Forrester's Reserve Chenin Blanc 2016

    Chenin blanc is always a great match for pork with apple, so opt for this multi award winner, which combines a creamy richness of flavour with bold apricot and baked apple character, balancing perfectly with the intensity of the veloute, and the fresh acidity of the apple and herbs.

  • World Malbec Day

    Why is Malbec World Day celebrated on 17th April?

    The origin of Malbec can be found in the southwest of France. Here they’ve been cultivating the grape and making wines with the appellation of Cahors since the days of the Roman Empire. During the Middle Ages, this wine grew in popularity, and this has only increased in modern times.

    Malbec arrived in Argentina in 1853 in the hands of Michel Aimé Pouget, a French agronomist who was hired by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento to carry out the management of the Agricultural Quinta de Mendoza.

    Modelled on France, the initiative proposed adding new grape varieties as a means to enhancing the national wine industry. On 17th April, 1853, with the support of the governor of Mendoza, a project was presented to the Provincial Legislature, with a view to establishing a Quinta Normal and Agricultural School. This project was approved by the House of Representatives on 6th September that year.

    In the late nineteenth century, with the help of Italian and French immigrants, the wine industry grew exponentially and with it, Malbec, which quickly adapted to the various terroirs, and developed with even better results than in its region of origin. Over time, and with a lot of hard work, Malbec emerged as the flagship grape of Argentina.

    For Wines of Argentina, 17th April was not only a symbol of the transformation of Argentina's wine industry, but also the starting point for the development of this grape, an emblem the country worldwide.

    According to Wines of Argentine, “Malbec is not just a wine. It is a fruit that generates work, individuality, culture and development. Each bottle is a declaration of what sets Argentina apart. Each bottle speaks of the hands, the dexterity and the soul of our men. This varietal expresses a way of doing things, a way of life; it involves technique, originality and passion. The deepest wines are born of the deepest longings of their peoples, those who reside in the heart. Malbec is the heart of our industry and continues to be our global ambassador.”

    It’s common knowledge that a glass of Malbec is perfectly accompanied by a hearty steak, but did you know the versatilty of this soulful wine extends far beyond red meat. To celebrate Malbec World Day, we bring you two surprising recipes to pair with Malbec... 

    Veggies + Malbec

     

    Porcini Mushroom Pasta

    1 cup dried porcini mushrooms soaked in 1 ½ cups of hot water for 1 hour
    400 gr pappardelle or fettucini (the egg-based varieties are best)
    2 garlic clove
    1 tbsp butter
    2 tbsp olive oil
    1 cup heavy cream
    1/2 cup red wine
    2 tbsp grated Parmesan
    3 tbsp chopped Italian parsley
    salt and pepper to taste

    Bring some water to the boil and then pour it over your dried porcini mushrooms. This will make them nice and tender and bring out the full flavour of the mushrooms. Let them sit for at least an hour.

    Time cooking your pasta to be ready at the same time the sauce is – you’ll add it to the pan that you're making the sauce to saute together when it's ready. Put the water on to boil for the pasta, then get started on the sauce.

    Once the porcini mushrooms have soaked, drain them and save the water. In a deep sauce pan drizzle some olive oil and heat on medium. Crush the garlic and sauté with the butter and olive oil until fragrant. Add the red wine and let the liquid absorb. Then add the porcini mushroom water and simmer on medium heat for about 10 minutes. Now you can add the pasta to boiling water.

    Once the pasta is in the water, stir the cream into the porcini mushroom sauce and add your salt and pepper. Let it simmer and thicken until the pasta is cooked. Drain the pasta and rinse delicately in cold water to stop the cooking process. Now add the pasta to the sauce and toss or fold the pasta into the porcini mushroom sauce.

    Sprinkle with the Italian parsley and freshly grated Parmesan to serve.

    Chocolate + Malbec

     

    Dark Chocolate and Malbec Ice Cream

    160g dark chocolate (90% cocoa solids)
    300ml double cream
    1/2 can condensed milk (approx~198ml)
    400ml of Malbec

    In a saucepan reduce the 400ml of Malbec on a medium heat until there's approximately 6-8 tbsps left, then set it aside to cool down.

    Break the dark chocolate up and melt it until it's runny and smooth. You can do this however you want, in a glass bowl over a saucepan of boiling water or in the microwave.

    In a large bowl, whisk together the double cream and condensed milk until you reach stiff peaks. Then fold in the chocolate and the reduced Malbec until it's all mixed in.

    Pour the mixture into a 500ml freezable container, you can buy disposable pots online, use a tupperware box or just pour it into a cake tin a la moi. Make sure you cover the ice cream with a lid or tightly wrap it in clingfilm, then put it in the freezer for 6 hours.

    Before you serve the ice cream take it out of the freezer for about 15 minutes to loosen up.

    Receive up to 20% off all Malbec in celebration of Malbec World Day | ends midnight Monday 17th April >

  • A Grape Match...

    Adas Bhamod | Spinach Soup

    (Serves 5-6)

    INGREDIENTS
    4 large garlic cloves
    6 tbsp sunflower oil
    30g fresh coriander, washed
    150g green lentils
    100g white long-grain rice
    1 large potato (about 150g), peeled and diced
    450g-500g baby spinach
    3 lemons, juice only

     

     

     

    METHOD
    1. In a wide and deep frying pan, add the garlic and 3-4 tbsp sunflower oil. Gently fry until the garlic starts to become a light golden colour.
    2. Roughly chop the coriander and add to the pan. Keep turning for 5 minutes until it's wilted. Set the mix aside.
    3. In a sieve, rinse the lentils, and cook in 1 ltr water for 10 minutes, until soft. Rinse the rice with warm water.
    4. When lentils are almost cooked, add the rice, potato and 2 ltrs water, and heat for about 10 minutes, until the potato and rice are cooked.
    5. Add the spinach, coriander mix, lemon juice and a pinch of salt and cook for a further 5 minutes, until the spinach wilts.
    6. Add 2 tbsp oil to the pan and turn the heat off after a few minutes, adding water, if needed, for consistency.
    7. Serve with bread and olives.

     

    Ixsir Altitudes White 2015 | £16.95

    Look no further than Lebanon itself for the perfect match. This wine is zesty fresh with a blend of Sauvignon and Semillon, with hints of exotic fruit and spice from a dollop of Viognier and Muscat. It picks up the citrus liveliness of the soup but is rich enough to cope with the chunky lentils and rice.

    - Angela Mount, Crumbs Magazine -

  • Roaming through the Rhone

    Domaine Brusset DinnerIf any Rhone wine lovers reading this have not yet made acquaintance with the delights of Domaine Brusset, I recommend that you do before Christmas.  Not only are the majority of the wines perfect festive fair, and brilliantly friendly with turkey, goose, and various party gatherings,  but they’re fascinatingly good, and superb value to boot.

    Last week, Great Western Wine’s Fine Wine Manager Tom King, hosted a delightful evening at the award-winning Allium restaurant, where executive Chef Chris Staines, created a stellar menu to showcase each of the wines.  Tom deserves extra praise for stepping in at the last minute  when winery owner Laurent Brusset was unfortunately delayed in a road pile up close to Dijon, but Tom was on expert form, and did Laurent proud, with his customary mix of intense knowledge and humour.

    This was a red wine only dinner; challenging for Chef, but ably delivered.  Chris Staines is undoubtedly one of the most wine-knowledgeable chefs around, and it’s refreshing to see his stance on wine dinners.  Unsurprisingly, his palate is fine-tuned, but unlike many chefs, who will take heed of wine styles , or pay lip service to them, before devising their menu, Chris insists on tasting each wine, and will then build the menu to showcase the wine – scents of ginger and nectarine? Chris will work something in. Mocha and dark chocolate on the palate? Again, I’ve seen Chris weave cacao into spicy meat dishes. Genius.

    Brusset’s world is the southern Rhone, that vast expanse of France, below Valence, leading to Provence; a land of heat, sunshine, olive trees and lavender fields, with sleepy villages, full of golden-hued houses, cafes, and village squares, where communities congregate.  In terms of wine, this is the land of Cotes du Rhone; within this, there are 18 villages, which now lay claim to their own appellation.  Unlike many regions, the magic of the southern Rhone is the mix of grape varieties, which all add to the unique mix of complexity and difference. Grenache, Syrah, Mourvedre and Cinsault are the classics, but many more abound.

    Domaine Brusset, Côtes du Ventoux Les BoudallesIn an unusual twist, one of my favourite, great value reds Côtes du Ventoux ‘Les Boudalles’ 2015, was served as an aperitif.  Had it been Summer, I’d have loved to have seen this served chilled. Côtes du Ventoux lies just south of the main Côtes du Rhone region, and produces some of the very best value Rhone wine around. Soft, juicy, with gentle, sweet plum and cherry fruit, at under £10, it’s a steal – stock up for Christmas Eve and Boxing Day parties, it’s a real crowd-pleaser.

    It’s not easy to pair a red wine with a starter, so Chris Staines was challenged and came up with a perfectly seared piece of pepper and sesame crusted tuna, enhanced, in his own unique way with a melange of chilli, turmeric, coriander and cumin infused lentils with a spicy mooli relish and a kick of yuzu.

    Tuna, like monkfish is a meaty fish that can cope with red wine.  Brusset Côtes du Rhone 'Laurent B’ 2015 was juicy,and packed with forest fruit flavours and hints of black pepper.  Bright, fruity, and another absolute Christmas bargain.  However for this dish, I found the alternative wine, Cairanne 'Les Travers’ 2014, the winner, with its sweet, rich, concentrated fruit, which matched with the natural sweetness of the tuna and the pepper spice. I’d certainly recommend this to anyone looking for a rich, silky red to impress, and tasting far more expensive than it is!

    For the main course, we moved to two wines from one of the best-known areas within the southern Rhone, Gigondas, known for its rich, meaty, well structured reds.  Top end Rhone wines are known for their natural match with rich, wintry dishes – this one didn’t disappoint. Meltingly tender, slow-cooked braised beef, with an enticing medley of autumnal favourites – slow-roasted and pan-fried, earthily sweet Jerusalem artichokes, on a bed of crunchy winter cabbage, sweetened with bacon, carrot and celeriac, atop a creamy and pungent artichoke puree, all infused with the heady scent of truffles – Autumn on a plate.

    Domaine Brusset, Gigondas Tradition Le Grand MontmirailTwo wines to stand up to this heady dish – both Gigondas; the first a dazzling, perfumed, rich red, with a bewitching orange peel and Christmas spice scent, and a bold, sweetly enticing flavour Gigondas ‘Le Grand Montmirail’ 2014 – from grapes grown in the shadows of the Montmirail mountains, sharp, jagged-edged hilltops and hot sunshine.  If you’re serving game, or slow roast lamb over Christmas, this will make you smile. What will make you smile even more is the utterly delicious and majestic ‘Les Hauts de Montmirail 2014 a stunningly crafted red, produced from the Grenache and Carignan grapes, oozing richness, concentration and class.  Packed with inky, licorice and dried fig character, it was absolutely spot on with the beef, and would serve as a worthy red to serve on Christmas Day.

    Rhone wines from the inky, Syrah-dominant reds of the north, through to the fragrant, yet rich diversity of the southern Rhone offer great value at every price point.  If you haven’t explored this producer yet, it’s a great time to start.  Enjoy!

    By Angela Mount

  • Make it at home with Botromagno

    Botromagno recipe

    Ingredients (four people)

    - 500g orecchiette (the traditional ear-shaped pasta of Puglia)
    - 1kg washed turnip greens without the stems
    - Garlic
    - 1 anchovy fillet
    - Salt
    - Chili pepper
    - Breadcrumbs

    Procedure

    Gently boil the turnip greens in salted water. When cooked, take out, keeping the water to cook the orecchiette in. In a large frying pan, gently brown the garlic in a little olive oil and then add the turnip greens and the anchovy fillet. Mix well and leave to cook for about 5 minutes. Meanwhile cook the orecchiette in the turnip green water until al dente. Drain, add to the frying pan and mix well for a couple of minutes. Serve with a sprinkling of breadcrumbs and a little chili pepper.

  • Make it at home with Cecchi

    Cecchi RecipeFor the pasta

    - 350g flour
    - 3 eggs
    - Salt
    - Olive oil

    Mix the flour and the eggs in a bowl. Add a pitch of salt and a drizzle of oil and mix to combine. Then add enough water to bring together the mix into a homogeneous ball. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rest for 30 mins.

    In the meantime, make your tortelli filling, for which you’ll need

    - 450g chard or silverbeet
    - 450g spinach
    - 350 fresh ricotta
    - Fresh marjoram
    - Nutmeg
    - Salt and pepper

    Parboil your spinach and chard in separate pots of boiling salted water for six minutes. Drain them, squeeze out any excess water and chop finely.

    Place the ricotta in a bowl. Add the chopped spinach and chard, a pinch of nutmeg and marjoram and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and set aside.

    Back to the pasta

    Lightly flour a clean surface. Roll out your pasta dough until it’s 2-3 millimetres thick and cut into 5-6 centimetre squares. They don’t have to be perfect. Aim for 12 even squares and you don’t even have to measure them out.

    With a teaspoon, place a small dollop of filling on the left hand side of the pasta square and fold the other side over to cover. Press down to seal the sides with your thumb and then use a fork to press all the way around the edges. Continue with the rest of the filling.

    Once you’re done, place a big pot of salted water on to boil. Add the tortelli to the water, making sure they don’t stick together. When the tortelli float to the top, they’re cooked!

    For the sauce

    - 2 garlic cloves
    - Parsley
    - bay leaf
    - 1 carrot
    - 500g minced beef
    - Glass of red wine
    - 350g can of chopped tomatoes
    - 1tbsp tomato paste
    - Salt and pepper
    - Olive oil
    - Parmesan to serve

    Chopped the garlic and a handful of parsley and fry in a hot saucepan with a drizzle of oil. Add the bay leaf, finely chopped carrots and minced meat and cook until the meat is browned. Pour in the red wine and cook until reduced.

    Lower the heat, add the canned tomatoes, a cup of water and the tomato paste and simmer for 40-45 minutes or until lovely and thick. Season with salt and pepper.

    Serve with the tortelli and a good shaving of Parmesan cheese

    Enjoy!

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