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The Grapevine

A blog from the team at Great Western Wine

  • Make it at home with Botromagno

    Botromagno recipe

    Ingredients (four people)

    - 500g orecchiette (the traditional ear-shaped pasta of Puglia)
    - 1kg washed turnip greens without the stems
    - Garlic
    - 1 anchovy fillet
    - Salt
    - Chili pepper
    - Breadcrumbs

    Procedure

    Gently boil the turnip greens in salted water. When cooked, take out, keeping the water to cook the orecchiette in. In a large frying pan, gently brown the garlic in a little olive oil and then add the turnip greens and the anchovy fillet. Mix well and leave to cook for about 5 minutes. Meanwhile cook the orecchiette in the turnip green water until al dente. Drain, add to the frying pan and mix well for a couple of minutes. Serve with a sprinkling of breadcrumbs and a little chili pepper.

  • Greetings from Ferrari...

    Greetings from Ferrari

    Tell us the story of the winery.

    Founded in 1902 in Trento by Giulio Ferrari and run since 1952 by the Lunelli family, Ferrari is Italy’s leading luxury sparkling wine and a symbol of the Italian 'art of living'.

    What's your nickname when you're at work?

    As the only Australian in winery I'm referred to as 'Kangaroo' or 'Din Don Dan' (Jingle Bells in Italian and rhymes with ‘Dean’).

    What's your winemaking philosophy?

    At Ferrari we produce Trentodoc sparkling wines utilising sustainable mountainous growing methods on the slopes of the Dolomites in northern Italy.

    What's your favourite cocktail?

    The ‘Ferrari YouGo’ for sure is my favourite which is a Ferrari twist on the popular sparkling wine cocktail ‘Hugo’ from Northern Italy.

    Tell us about your most memorable food and wine moment.

    World’s Top Restaurant for 2016 ‘Osteria Francescana, meeting with Chef Massimo Bottura and drinking a bottle of Giulio Ferrari. Was outstanding!

    You’re a castaway and you can only take three wines, one book and two luxury items with you - what are these and why?

    Three Wines 

    Giulio Ferrari Riserva del Fondatore. It's all I'd need (x3)!

    One Book 

    Blue Lagoon by H. De Vere Stacpoole.

    Two Luxury Items

    Solar battery charger & iPod (for musical interludes).

    If you weren't working in wine, what would your 'Plan B' be?

    Rock Star. Or an olive oil producer.

    You can cook for three guests (living or dead): who are they, and what would you cook them? Also give us a run-down of what you'll be drinking.

    John Lennon, Mao Ze Dong, & Mohammad Ali. I’d cook them a traditional Italian meal comprising of antipasti, seafood pasta and a fish main. Would start with a bottle of Ferrari Maximum Brut which is a great starting point, followed by a Ferrari Perlé for the pasta dish and to close I’d love to pop the cork on a bottle of Giulio Ferrari. Would be monumental!

  • Make it at home with Cecchi

    Cecchi RecipeFor the pasta

    - 350g flour
    - 3 eggs
    - Salt
    - Olive oil

    Mix the flour and the eggs in a bowl. Add a pitch of salt and a drizzle of oil and mix to combine. Then add enough water to bring together the mix into a homogeneous ball. Cover with a tea towel and leave to rest for 30 mins.

    In the meantime, make your tortelli filling, for which you’ll need

    - 450g chard or silverbeet
    - 450g spinach
    - 350 fresh ricotta
    - Fresh marjoram
    - Nutmeg
    - Salt and pepper

    Parboil your spinach and chard in separate pots of boiling salted water for six minutes. Drain them, squeeze out any excess water and chop finely.

    Place the ricotta in a bowl. Add the chopped spinach and chard, a pinch of nutmeg and marjoram and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well and set aside.

    Back to the pasta

    Lightly flour a clean surface. Roll out your pasta dough until it’s 2-3 millimetres thick and cut into 5-6 centimetre squares. They don’t have to be perfect. Aim for 12 even squares and you don’t even have to measure them out.

    With a teaspoon, place a small dollop of filling on the left hand side of the pasta square and fold the other side over to cover. Press down to seal the sides with your thumb and then use a fork to press all the way around the edges. Continue with the rest of the filling.

    Once you’re done, place a big pot of salted water on to boil. Add the tortelli to the water, making sure they don’t stick together. When the tortelli float to the top, they’re cooked!

    For the sauce

    - 2 garlic cloves
    - Parsley
    - bay leaf
    - 1 carrot
    - 500g minced beef
    - Glass of red wine
    - 350g can of chopped tomatoes
    - 1tbsp tomato paste
    - Salt and pepper
    - Olive oil
    - Parmesan to serve

    Chopped the garlic and a handful of parsley and fry in a hot saucepan with a drizzle of oil. Add the bay leaf, finely chopped carrots and minced meat and cook until the meat is browned. Pour in the red wine and cook until reduced.

    Lower the heat, add the canned tomatoes, a cup of water and the tomato paste and simmer for 40-45 minutes or until lovely and thick. Season with salt and pepper.

    Serve with the tortelli and a good shaving of Parmesan cheese

    Enjoy!

  • Greetings from... Ascheri

    Ascheri
    What's your nickname when you're at work?

    The Bear or Babbo Natale (Santa Klaus).

    What's your winemaking philosophy?

    In a world where wines are generally produced with the same grapes, the same technology, the same wood for ageing and above all the same consultants, my aim is to obtain a wine which is the expression of the vineyard it comes from, of the grapes it was made of, and above all of my own ideas.

    And these ideas are based on concepts of natural concentration, arriving from the vineyards and not from winery equipments, balance, elegance and finesse.

    An absolutely personal approach in order to produce a unique wine.

    “How to listen, comparing wine with music, an “acoustic” version instead of an “electronic”one.”

    What's your favourite cocktail?

    Caipiroska.

    Tell us about your most memorable food and wine moment.

    Aged Castelmagno (Piedmontese cow milk cheese) + Barolo with more than 30 years age.

    You’re a castaway and you can only take three wines, one book and two luxury items with you - what are these and why?

    Three Wines 

    Chateau Grillet - Romanéè Conti (one of) - Bruno Giacosa Barolo Falletto.

    One Book 

    Il nome della Rosa (The name of the Rose) - Umberto Eco.

    Two Luxury Items

    A music player + music to listen / a comfortable armchair.

    If you weren't working in wine, what would your 'Plan B' be?

    A sea fisherman.

    You can cook for three guests (living or dead): who are they, and what would you cook them? Also give us a run-down of what you'll be drinking.

    Sean Connery (Actor)- tajarin (Piedmontese pasta dish) butter and sage + white truffle - Dolcetto d'Alba Nirane 2015. Sergio Leone (Italian film director)- Piedmontese veal braised in Barolo wine - Barolo Sorano 2012. Dave Gahan (Depeche Mode frontman) - Moscato zabaglione cream - Moscato d'Asti 2015.

  • Make it at home with Morgenster

    Ingredients (serves eight)

    - 170 gcaster sugar

    - 230ml milk

    - Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

    - 1 vanilla bean, split and seeds scraped

    - 100ml Morgenster Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    - 3 teaspoons sambuca

    - 2 eggs, lightly beaten

    - 1⅓ cups (200 g) self-raising flour

    - ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

    - 7–8 apricots, cut into quarters

    - Flaked almonds, for sprinkling

    - Fresh ricotta and honey, to serve (optional)

    Directions

    1. Preheat your oven to 180°C (160°C fan-forced). Grease and flour a 27 cm x 21 cm rectangular or 21 cm square cake tin (or line it with baking paper).

    2. Place the sugar, milk and lemon zest in a medium saucepan over low heat and cook for 3–4 minutes, stirring regularly, until the sugar has dissolved. Do not let the milk come to the boil. Turn off the heat and stir in the vanilla seeds, olive oil and liqueur (if using), then let the mixture cool for 5–10 minutes.

    3. Add the beaten egg, flour and bicarbonate of soda and whisk to form a smooth batter. Pour the batter into the prepared tin and arrange the apricot quarters on top any way you like. Sprinkle with the flaked almonds and bake for 30–35 minutes or until pale golden and a skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean. Cool in the tin for a few minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and cool at room temperature for 1 hour before cutting. Serve just as it is or with honey drizzled ricotta.

  • Greetings from Chateau Ste. Michelle

    Tell us the story of the winery.

    Chateau Ste Michelle is the founding wine producer in Washington State. It is also the most acclaimed.

    What's your nickname when you're at work?

    NNothing that’s repeatable!

    What's your winemaking philosophy?

    Taking new world fruit, making wine with a nod to European tradition and letting the magic of Washington State shine through.

    What's your favourite cocktail?

    Mojito.

    Tell us about your most memorable food and wine moment.

    Tasting a first growth for the first time in a restaurant as an 18 year old. It was Chateau Margaux 1982 - my light bulb moment.

    You’re a castaway and you can only take three wines, one book and two luxury items with you - what are these and why?

    Three Wines 

    Eroica Riesling, Col Solare and Stag's Leap Wine Cellars Fay.

    One Book 

    The Secret History - Donna Tart.

    Two Luxury Items

    Music and phtographs (an ipad??).

    If you weren't working in wine, what would your 'Plan B' be?

    Being a Scotsman I've always liked the thought of the whisky business.

    You can cook for three guests (living or dead): who are they, and what would you cook them? Also give us a run-down of what you'll be drinking.

    Richard Burton (Actor), Greg Lemond (cyclist), Kim Basinger (I'm a man of a certain age). I'd cook something simple to share  and I'd let the guests run riot in my cellar with a Coravin, tasting and drinking whatever they like.

  • Make it at home with Chivite

    Ingredients

    The stuffed shoulder of mutton Garnish

    - 1 boned shoulder of spring lamb green asparagus

    - ½ onion French beans

    - ½ green pepper artichokes

    - 35gr crystallised boletus mushrooms young garlic

    - 3 lamb sweetbreads green pepper

    - 2 kidneys red pepper

    - 3 cloves of garlic Mange-tout

    - Olive oil Slices of crystallised tomato

    - Salt

    - Pepper

    Cheese Juice

    - Rosemary

    - ½ litre of milk

    Gravy

    - ½ litre of cream

    - Meat juices

    - ¼ Kg. smoked Idiazabal cheese

    - Boletus mushrooms

     

    Preparation


    Stuffed shoulder of mutton: 
    Poach the onion, the green pepper and the mushrooms slowly for two hours. Sauté the sliced sweetbreads and kidneys and mix them with the above. Stuff the shoulder and brown it on the pan. Vacuum seal with 3 cloves of garlic, rosemary, pepper and lamb gravy. Cook at 60º for about 12 hours. Heat and glaze in the oven.

    Garnish: Clean all the vegetables and fry them in Bajo Aragón olive oil.

    Gravy: Reduce the meat juices to demiglace and add boletus edulis mushroom slices; leave to simmer and then serve straight on the plate.

    Cheese juice: Leave to simmer gently for 2 hours. Strain through serge to obtain the desired Idiazabal cheese juice.

    Presentation: Place a 3-cm oven-glazed roll of shoulder of lamb in the centre of the plate. Arrange the fried vegetables on top and flavour with rosemary butter. Finally, pour the meat and cheese juices over the meat and vegetables.

  • Greetings from El Esteco

    Tell us the story of the winery.

    Trapiche’s story began in 1883, in a small vineyard called ‘El Trapiche’, in Mendoza, Argentina’s main winemaking region. There, the grapes for the first fine wines were grown. With more than 130 years of experience, Trapiche has earned its place as a pioneer in innovative grape growing and winemaking practices in Argentina, such as the introduction of French vines, the production of varietal wines, the import of French oak barrels and the use of stainless steel tanks.

    Trapiche owns over 1,000 hectares of vineyards and works collaboratively with more than 300 growers from different areas of Mendoza, in a continuous effort to improve wine quality.
    It was one of the first Argentinean wineries to enter the international scene, and has now become Argentina's largest fine wine exporter.

    True to its origins, today Trapiche is in a continuous quest for the latest best practices and product innovations, such as the first Argentinean Oceanic region’s wines.

    What's your nickname when you're at work?

    Martis.

    What's your winemaking philosophy?

    I have always considered wines as a exciting way to discover different expressions of origin, terroir, climate and culture of a region.

    What's your favourite cocktail?

    Gin and tonic and Mojitos!!

    Tell us about your most memorable food and wine moment.

    It happened last weekend: we prepared empanadas with some friends and enjoyed them with a beautiful Malbec from Uco Valley.

    You’re a castaway and you can only take three wines, one book and two luxury items with you - what are these and why?

    Three Wines 

    Trapiche Iscay Merlot-Malbec, Elephant Hills Sauvignon Blanc, Chateau Trotanoy Pomerol.

    One Book 

    El Aleph, Jorge Luis Borges.

    Two Luxury Items

    A good shower bathroom and a super comfy  bed.

    If you weren't working in wine, what would your 'Plan B' be?

    I would be a novel writer.

    You can cook for three guests (living or dead): who are they, and what would you cook them? Also give us a run-down of what you'll be drinking.

    I would cook for Cleopatra, Frida Khalo and Andy Warhol. I would prepare Peruvian Sushi with Don David Torrontes and mushroom risotto with Malbec.

  • Greetings from Leyda

    Tell us the story of the winery.

    Viña Leyda is a pioneer in the development of cool coastal vineyards in Chile (first to plant in the Leyda Valley in 1998), creating a new wine region (DO approved in 2002). Today Viña Leyda has 3 vineyards in the Valley (between 4 and 12 km from the Pacific Ocean) with a total of 190 hectares (104 Pinot Noir and 48 Sauvignon Blanc).The name and logo of Viña Leyda comes from an old train station, whose building was destroyed by a fire in 1983.

    What's your nickname when you're at work?

    Lali.

    What's your winemaking philosophy?

    Winemaking is a natural process, so the less human intervention, the better. Wines should reflect the grape variety and place of origin.

    What's your favourite cocktail?

    Gin and tonic.

    Tell us about your most memorable food and wine moment.

    My 30 birthday, i was living in Bordeaux and my now husband organized me a surprise dinner party at a Michelin star restaurant and all our friends brought as a gift wines from the year i was born.

    You’re a castaway and you can only take three wines, one book and two luxury items with you - what are these and why?

    Three Wines 

    Leyda Lot 4 Sauvignon Blanc, Leyda Single Vineyard Las Brisas Pinot Noir, Leyda Single Vineyard Canelo Syrah.

    One Book 

    Complete works of Jorge Luis Borges.

    Two Luxury Items

    iPad + solar charger.

    If you weren't working in wine, what would your 'Plan B' be?

    Tango dancer

    You can cook for three guests (living or dead): who are they, and what would you cook them? Also give us a run-down of what you'll be drinking.

    Gustavo Cerati, Salvador Dali, Leonardo Da Vinci. Oysters + Ceviche with Leyda 4 Sauvignon Blanc. Dessert: damp chocolate cake, with dulce de leche and merengue, with Leyda sparkling.

  • Greetings from Chalmers...

    Greetings from Chalmers

    Tell us the story of the winery.

    The Chalmers family’s commitment to innovation and excellence has made them a pivotal force in the Australian wine scene and saw them collectively named Gourmet Traveller WINE magazine’s Viticulturists of the Year in 2014.  Chalmers wines are estate grown at the family’s Heathcote vineyard, established in 2008, but their place in the viticultural landscape in Australia goes back more than 30 years.

    What's your nickname when you're at work?

    Snoozey.

    What's your winemaking philosophy?

    Let the grapes speak for themselves.

    What's your favourite cocktail?

    Anything bitter - Love a negroni or ameicano, or a good old campari and soda.

    Tell us about your most memorable food and wine moment.

    So hard to choose just one!  But being a lover of all things Italian - the best pasta of my life was in an osteria in Umbria in 2008 where I had a summer truffle and air dried ricotta strognozzi with our Italian 'brother' viticulturist Dott. Stefano Dini who is a Tuscan native.  He introduced me to Perticaia Sagrantino and it was a revelation, so much more approachable than other Sagrantino wines I'd had before.  Also sagrantino just made so much sense with the earthy summer truffles and sitting in the centre of the region it comes from.

    You’re a castaway and you can only take three wines, one book and two luxury items with you - what are these and why?

    Three Wines 

    A Burklin Wolf Wachenheimer Riesling, A Villa Mathilde Falanghina and a Wiston Blanc de Blancs.  Dry textured and aromatic wines with plenty of zippy acidity.  Love a refreshing drink.

    One Book 

    Any book by William Gibson, the cyberfantasy legend whose writing has the ability to completely take me to another place.

    Two Luxury Items

    A guitar and comfy bed.

    If you weren't working in wine, what would your 'Plan B' be?

    Performing arts.  I trained as a composer and started my career in this field.  I've also curated arts festivals etc and love the industry.  I would definitely be working with artists and performance.

    You can cook for three guests (living or dead): who are they, and what would you cook them? Also give us a run-down of what you'll be drinking.

    I'd cook for Paul Simon, Steve Reich and Professor Brian Cox.  I'd probably cook Indian as I LOVE working with all the raw spices and spending the day constructing lots of different dishes to serve all together.  I would be serving dry, textured aromatic white wines and possibly a cheeky dry rose or bright young drinking red wine.  More than likely it would be a vegetarian meal and probably Aussie, Italian and German wines.

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